Seminar recap: Americans’ sweet tooth needs to be pulled

[ Posted on June 5th, 2017 by Center Communications | No Comments » ]
William McCarthy, Susan Babey, and an ad that overwhelms a drinking fountain at SEA-TAC Airport (photo by Leslie Mikkelson of Prevention Institute)

William McCarthy, Susan Babey presenting at the seminar on excess sugar consumption, and an ad at SEA-TAC Airport that illustrates their topic.
“Even the best water station has trouble competing with commercially marketed sugar,” said Babey. “Can you even see the water fountain?”
(Photo by Leslie Mikkelson of Prevention Institute)

Americans — especially adolescents and teens — consume far above the amount of calories in excess sugar than the recommended maximum and may be making themselves sick in the process, according to research presented at the Center’s Health Policy Seminar Series on May 31.

“There is an increasing amount of evidence linking consumption of excess sugar with poor health outcomes, including obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease,” said Susan Babey, co-director of the Center’s Chronic Disease Program. (more…)

Proposed budget cut biggest in EPA’s history, panelist says

[ Posted on April 25th, 2017 by Center Communications | No Comments » ]
From left: Meng, Malloy, Jerrett, Zhu

From left: Ying-Ying Meng, Timothy Malloy, Michael Jerrett, Yifang Zhu

The Trump administration’s proposed 31 percent cut to the national EPA budget — and a 60 percent cut to California’s EPA Region 9 — would be the agency’s “biggest in history,” said panelist Michael Jerrett at the April 25 Grand Rounds lecture, “Environmentally Unhealthy? The Health and Environmental Implications of Proposed EPA Budget Cuts.”

Jerrett, chair of the Department of Environmental Health Sciences and director of the Center for Occupational and Environmental Health, was a seminar panelist along with Ying-Ying Meng,  co-director of the Chronic Disease Program at the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, and Timothy Malloy, professor at the UCLA School of Law and director of the UCLA Sustainable Technology and Policy Program. (more…)

UCLA experts predict demise of AHCA at March 22 forum

[ Posted on March 29th, 2017 by Center Communications | No Comments » ]
kominski_torrensforum_740px

Center Director Gerald Kominski speaking at the March 22 Health Forum.

Replacing the Affordable Care Act with the proposed American Health Care Act is a negative shift in priorities that redistributes wealth at the expense of Americans’ health, according to a lively panel discussion at a March 22 Paul Torrens Health Forum, which took place two days before the bill was tabled.

Alexander Li

Alexander Li

The discussion – titled “ACA Repeal and Replace: What’s the Latest?” — was moderated by Thomas Rice, distinguished professor in the Department of Health Policy and Management at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, and co-sponsored by the Fielding School and the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research.

Audience members gasped as Gerald Kominski, director of the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, described the replacement plan’s steep cuts to Medicaid subsidies for low-income households and warned that the AHCA is “a huge mistake and a public health disaster.” Kominski added that one positive result of the ACA repeal/replacement is the return of discussions about a single-payer health system. (more…)

Seminar recap: Latinos’ significant gains in health coverage at risk under ACA repeal, speaker says

[ Posted on February 2nd, 2017 by Center Communications | No Comments » ]

mcevoy slide3Latinos saw a 20-percentage-point drop in their uninsurance rate between 2010 and 2016 — the biggest decline of any ethnic group — as millions gained health coverage under the Affordable Care Act, said Michelle McEvoy Doty in a Jan. 24 seminar hosted by the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research and the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health.

Doty, vice president of survey research and evaluation for The Commonwealth Fund, said during the seminar “Trends in Health Insurance Coverage and Access to Care Among Latinos: Implications of an ACA Repeal” that national uninsurance rates for adult Latinos declined from 43.2 percent in 2010 to 24.8 percent in 2016. Despite that impressive gain, their rates are significantly higher than those of other ethnicities. The uninsurance rate is 8.7 percent for Whites and 14.8 percent for African-Americans.

(more…)

Seminar today: How the ACA’s repeal will impact Latinos

[ Posted on January 24th, 2017 by Center Communications | No Comments » ]

michelle_mcevoy_dotyIn today’s noon seminar, Michelle McEvoy Doty, vice president of survey research & evaluation for The Commonwealth Fund, will examine the likely effect of various proposals to repeal the Affordable Care Act (ACA) on Latinos, up to 29 percent of whom voted for President Trump. Using data from The Commonwealth Fund’s Biennial Health Insurance Surveys, Doty will look at gains made in coverage and access, and discuss options for those at risk of losing coverage.

This seminar is co-sponsored by the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research and the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health as part of the latter’s Public Health Grand Rounds seminar series.

What: “Trends in Health Insurance Coverage and Access to Care Among Latinos: Implications of an ACA Repeal”​
Who:​ Michelle McEvoy Doty, vice president of survey research & evaluation for The Commonwealth Fund
Date: Today, Jan. 24, 2017
Time:​ ​Noon-1 p.m.
Location:​ ​Room 33-105, Center for the Health Sciences (CHS Building)
UCLA Fielding School of Public Health
650 Charles E. Young Drive South
Los Angeles, CA 90095 [Map]
Detailed directions
​RSVP: https://phgrandroundsmichelledoty.eventbrite.com/

 Join us via live-streaming webinar here:
http://connectpro72759986.adobeconnect.com/uclachprseminars/

Study: Who will lose in California if the ACA is repealed?

[ Posted on January 13th, 2017 by Center Communications | No Comments » ]

ACArepealThumbLow-income earners, young adults, part-time workers, and people of color in California gained the most between 2013 and 2015 when health insurance was expanded under the Affordable Care Act, according to a new report by the UC Berkeley Center for Labor research and Education and the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research.

Now, with the impending repeal and replacement of the ACA, people in these and other groups have the most to lose and risk sliding back into the ranks of the uninsured, acccording to the report.

Under the ACA, California cut the number of its uninsured residents in half, from 6.5 million in 2013 to 3.3 million in 2015 — the largest decline in the uninsured rate of any state. The two major reasons for this drop were the expansion of Medicaid and the federal subsidies that helped make it affordable for people to buy individual insurance through the state health insurance marketplace, Covered California. Statewide, 9.4 percent of the adult population enrolled in the expanded Medi-Cal, and 3.1 percent enrolled in Covered California using subsidies.

Medi-Cal expansion drove most of the drop in uninsurance rates, enabling 3.7 million adults to become newly eligible for coverage. Under a repeal, counties with high Medi-Cal expansion enrollment – Humboldt, Mendocino (both 13.9 percent), Trinity (13.6 percent), Fresno (12 percent), and Stanislaus (11.6 percent) – could be heavily affected.

Read the study: ACA Repeal in California: Who Stands to Lose?

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