Seminar recap: Latinos’ significant gains in health coverage at risk under ACA repeal, speaker says

[ Posted on February 2nd, 2017 by Center Communications | No Comments » ]

mcevoy slide3Latinos saw a 20-percentage-point drop in their uninsurance rate between 2010 and 2016 — the biggest decline of any ethnic group — as millions gained health coverage under the Affordable Care Act, said Michelle McEvoy Doty in a Jan. 24 seminar hosted by the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research and the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health.

Doty, vice president of survey research and evaluation for The Commonwealth Fund, said during the seminar “Trends in Health Insurance Coverage and Access to Care Among Latinos: Implications of an ACA Repeal” that national uninsurance rates for adult Latinos declined from 43.2 percent in 2010 to 24.8 percent in 2016. Despite that impressive gain, their rates are significantly higher than those of other ethnicities. The uninsurance rate is 8.7 percent for Whites and 14.8 percent for African-Americans.

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Seminar today: How the ACA’s repeal will impact Latinos

[ Posted on January 24th, 2017 by Center Communications | No Comments » ]

michelle_mcevoy_dotyIn today’s noon seminar, Michelle McEvoy Doty, vice president of survey research & evaluation for The Commonwealth Fund, will examine the likely effect of various proposals to repeal the Affordable Care Act (ACA) on Latinos, up to 29 percent of whom voted for President Trump. Using data from The Commonwealth Fund’s Biennial Health Insurance Surveys, Doty will look at gains made in coverage and access, and discuss options for those at risk of losing coverage.

This seminar is co-sponsored by the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research and the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health as part of the latter’s Public Health Grand Rounds seminar series.

What: “Trends in Health Insurance Coverage and Access to Care Among Latinos: Implications of an ACA Repeal”​
Who:​ Michelle McEvoy Doty, vice president of survey research & evaluation for The Commonwealth Fund
Date: Today, Jan. 24, 2017
Time:​ ​Noon-1 p.m.
Location:​ ​Room 33-105, Center for the Health Sciences (CHS Building)
UCLA Fielding School of Public Health
650 Charles E. Young Drive South
Los Angeles, CA 90095 [Map]
Detailed directions
​RSVP: https://phgrandroundsmichelledoty.eventbrite.com/

 Join us via live-streaming webinar here:
http://connectpro72759986.adobeconnect.com/uclachprseminars/

Study: Who will lose in California if the ACA is repealed?

[ Posted on January 13th, 2017 by Center Communications | No Comments » ]

ACArepealThumbLow-income earners, young adults, part-time workers, and people of color in California gained the most between 2013 and 2015 when health insurance was expanded under the Affordable Care Act, according to a new report by the UC Berkeley Center for Labor research and Education and the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research.

Now, with the impending repeal and replacement of the ACA, people in these and other groups have the most to lose and risk sliding back into the ranks of the uninsured, acccording to the report.

Under the ACA, California cut the number of its uninsured residents in half, from 6.5 million in 2013 to 3.3 million in 2015 — the largest decline in the uninsured rate of any state. The two major reasons for this drop were the expansion of Medicaid and the federal subsidies that helped make it affordable for people to buy individual insurance through the state health insurance marketplace, Covered California. Statewide, 9.4 percent of the adult population enrolled in the expanded Medi-Cal, and 3.1 percent enrolled in Covered California using subsidies.

Medi-Cal expansion drove most of the drop in uninsurance rates, enabling 3.7 million adults to become newly eligible for coverage. Under a repeal, counties with high Medi-Cal expansion enrollment – Humboldt, Mendocino (both 13.9 percent), Trinity (13.6 percent), Fresno (12 percent), and Stanislaus (11.6 percent) – could be heavily affected.

Read the study: ACA Repeal in California: Who Stands to Lose?

CDC’s 2017 campaign shows effects of secondhand smoke

[ Posted on January 12th, 2017 by Center Communications | No Comments » ]
CDC’s 2017 campaign shows effects of secondhand smoke

Two years ago, exposure to secondhand smoke at work triggered a life-threatening asthma attack that left 16-year-old Jamason hospitalized for four days.

“I didn’t know what was happening. I didn’t know why I wasn’t able to breathe,” said Jamason, now 18. “I didn’t know anything. I just knew that I couldn’t breathe.”

His story is one of many highlighted in the Tips From Former Smokers™ Campaign.

This week the national advertising campaign, launched by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in 2012, returns to print and digital publications in major media markets.  Instead of using actors, the stark ads show some of the 16 million Americans living with stomas, lung cancer, amputations, and other serious health conditions that result from smoking or exposure to smoke. In addition to personal stories, the ads direct viewers to free resources to help them quit smoking. (more…)

Jan. 12 legislative briefing in Sacramento: “Breaking the Barriers to Breast Cancer Care: Exploring Policy Options”

[ Posted on January 5th, 2017 by Center Communications | No Comments » ]

One in eight women in the country will develop breast cancer. Yet from narrow provider networks to cultural and linguistic obstacles, serious barriers exist for women seeking breast cancer treatment in California.

At this Jan. 12 public legislative briefing in Sacramento, co-sponsored by the California Latino Legislative Caucus, researchers from the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research will present findings from a new statewide study on obstacles to breast cancer care.

Please join us to learn how we can tear down the barriers to high-quality breast cancer care in California.

What: “Breaking the Barriers to Breast Cancer Care: Exploring policy options”​
Speakers:​ Sen. Richard Pan (D-Sacramento), Ninez Ponce, UCLA Center for Health Policy Research Associate Director; Sarah de Guia, California Pan-Ethnic Health Network (CPEHN) Executive Director; A.J. Scheitler, study co-author, UCLA Center for Health Policy
Date: ​Thursday, Jan. 12, 2017
Time:​ 12:30 p.m. registration; ​1-2 p.m. briefing
Location:​ ​Room 4203, State Capitol Building, 1315 10th Street, Sacramento 95814 [map]

The UCLA Center for Health Policy Research and the UCLA Center for Cancer Prevention & Control Research partnered on the study, funded by the California Breast Cancer Research Program.

For more information, contact A.J. Scheitler at ajscheitler@ucla.edu

Kominski at UCLA Anderson Forecast: Trump ACA replacement plan still unclear; expect “repeal and delay”

[ Posted on December 9th, 2016 by Center Communications | No Comments » ]
kominski_uclaandersonfore-ast_20161206

Panelists, from left to right: David Shulman, Gerald F. Kominski, Kal Raustiala, Jeffrey B. Lewis, Sebastian Edwards. Photo courtesy of UCLA Anderson School of Management

Center Director Gerald Kominski spoke about the possible effects the incoming Trump administration’s repeal of the Affordable Care Act could have on the U.S. health care system at the UCLA Anderson Economic Forecast: “What Do Trumponomics Really Mean for the U.S., California and L.A.?” The Dec. 6 event was hosted by the UCLA Anderson School of Management and addressed the overall impact the new administration could have on the nation’s economy.

Kominski suggested that a “repeal and delay” strategy would be used, which would give  Congress two or so years to come up an alternative plan. He said the biggest question is: What does the replacement plan look like?

Kominski said 20 million more Americans gained health insurance after the ACA was enacted. “The program is an overwhelming success with regard to its primary goal.”

Read a full story about the economic forecast at the UCLA Anderson blog.

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