Posts Tagged ‘goods movement’

UCLA’s ALERT project informs residents on harmful air pollution

Monday, May 7th, 2012

A UCLA Center for Health Policy Research project that educates residents about air pollution and its impact on their neighborhood’s health is featured in UCLA Today, the university’s faculty and staff newspaper.

The ALERT (Assessment of Local Environmental Risk Training) project is part of the Center’s Health DATA Program and targets two neighborhoods that bear … [ Read full post ]

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May 2 & 3 Convening (Los Angeles): Paying the price with our Health

Monday, April 2nd, 2012

You are invited to join the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research and their community partners on May 2 & 3 for the “Paying the Price with Our Health” conference at The California Endowment Conference Center. This free event will engage community residents, service providers, educators, faith organizations, decision makers and others in developing … [ Read full post ]

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Data (and expertise) = credible advocacy

Wednesday, June 1st, 2011

Angelo Logan is the co-founder of East Yard Communities for Environmental Justice.  In this brief interview, he talks about the benefits of partnering with environmental and other experts who can lend credibility to community advocacy.

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Jazmin Zane: Air pollution: Plan of attack

Thursday, April 7th, 2011
EHAP Picture

By Jazmin Zane, ALERT Project Manager

We know air pollution is a huge health problem, especially in Los Angeles, one of the smoggiest cities in the country.  But how do we fight back?  

Recently local groups in two of the worst-affected areas — Long Beach and Boyle Heights — decided to do something about it. … [ Read full post ]

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